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MY WEBSITE

23. Newcastle, AUS

Things I draw.
Things I design.
A few photos here and there.

HIRE ME
marcusdixondesign@gmail.com
Go for 2F & 5V per day, or 1 giant F.

Tangible objects 2 weeks away.

Instagram = @comesundown

Go for 2F & 5V per day, or 1 giant F.

Tangible objects 2 weeks away.

Instagram = @comesundown

Australia has a number of native animals that are in a vulnerable position and The Greater Bilby is one of them. If you are at all interested in the preservation of Australia’s unique wildlife, have a read of the small bit of information I have gathered and consider following the links at the bottom to learn more or make a donation to a cause supporting the Bilby and other native animals.
I’d also be very appreciative if you shared this image to promote such great causes.
Thanks!
"In earlier times, bilbies were found across large areas of Australia, but numbers have declined rapidly in the last one hundred years because of competition for food with farm livestock, and feral rabbits introduced into Australia since European settlement. Other feral animals introduced into Australia, and not native to the Continent, such as feral cats and foxes, have also severely depleted bilby numbers by preying upon them for food, to the point that they have been officially classified nationally, internationally and in the Northern Territory, as Vulnerable to Extinction, while in Queensland under their state legislation the bilby is classified as endangered. 
In order to try and save the bilby from extinction, there have been a number of efforts to create predator-free reserves in Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia and even New South Wales, with varying degrees of success. Importantly, very interesting work is being carried out by local Aboriginal communities in the Outback, close to the areas where the bilby still exists in its traditional habitat and natural environment. For these communities, the bilby is not only a lovely animal, but a very important part of their culture and spiritual beliefs (The Dreaming), literally going back tens of thousands of years. Therefore, for Aboriginal Australians, who did not introduce the feral animals now threatening the bilby’s survival, the loss of the bilby would be very deeply felt. Local Aboriginal communities are working alongside Land Council members and scientists to survey and monitor bilby populations, using traditional tracking skills and expert knowledge of the country. Special methods are being developed to reduce the numbers of predators preying on the bilby. These projects are overseen by the Threatened Species Recovery Team, assisted by the Threatened Species Network, and supported by the Natural Heritage Trust, an Australian Government department. In this way, different people and organisations who share a common concern about the threat to the survival of the bilby, and other native wildlife, can all join together to work for the common good.”
(http://www.australianwildlife.net.au/pdf/bilby/AWS_Project_Bilby.pdf)
There are some great organisations out there doing all they can to help this all ready vulnerable species:
www.savethebilbyfund.com contains loads of information on the work they are doing and you can also purchase some rad products from their online store with the proceeds going to the cause. You can also make direct donations here of varying amounts. 
www.australianwildlife.net.au is another great organisation working to preserve and protect Australia’s wildlife in all its forms. The site also contains a donation section if you want to help the cause.

Australia has a number of native animals that are in a vulnerable position and The Greater Bilby is one of them. If you are at all interested in the preservation of Australia’s unique wildlife, have a read of the small bit of information I have gathered and consider following the links at the bottom to learn more or make a donation to a cause supporting the Bilby and other native animals.

I’d also be very appreciative if you shared this image to promote such great causes.

Thanks!

"In earlier times, bilbies were found across large areas of Australia, but numbers have declined rapidly in the last one hundred years because of competition for food with farm livestock, and feral rabbits introduced into Australia since European settlement. Other feral animals introduced into Australia, and not native to the Continent, such as feral cats and foxes, have also severely depleted bilby numbers by preying upon them for food, to the point that they have been officially classified nationally, internationally and in the Northern Territory, as Vulnerable to Extinction, while in Queensland under their state legislation the bilby is classified as endangered. 

In order to try and save the bilby from extinction, there have been a number of efforts to create predator-free reserves in Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia and even New South Wales, with varying degrees of success. Importantly, very interesting work is being carried out by local Aboriginal communities in the Outback, close to the areas where the bilby still exists in its traditional habitat and natural environment. For these communities, the bilby is not only a lovely animal, but a very important part of their culture and spiritual beliefs (The Dreaming), literally going back tens of thousands of years. Therefore, for Aboriginal Australians, who did not introduce the feral animals now threatening the bilby’s survival, the loss of the bilby would be very deeply felt. Local Aboriginal communities are working alongside Land Council members and scientists to survey and monitor bilby populations, using traditional tracking skills and expert knowledge of the country. Special methods are being developed to reduce the numbers of predators preying on the bilby. These projects are overseen by the Threatened Species Recovery Team, assisted by the Threatened Species Network, and supported by the Natural Heritage Trust, an Australian Government department. In this way, different people and organisations who share a common concern about the threat to the survival of the bilby, and other native wildlife, can all join together to work for the common good.”

(http://www.australianwildlife.net.au/pdf/bilby/AWS_Project_Bilby.pdf)

There are some great organisations out there doing all they can to help this all ready vulnerable species:

www.savethebilbyfund.com contains loads of information on the work they are doing and you can also purchase some rad products from their online store with the proceeds going to the cause. You can also make direct donations here of varying amounts. 

www.australianwildlife.net.au is another great organisation working to preserve and protect Australia’s wildlife in all its forms. The site also contains a donation section if you want to help the cause.

Australia has a number of native animals that are in a vulnerable position and The Greater Bilby is one of them. If you are at all interested in the preservation of Australia’s unique wildlife, have a read of the small bit of information I have gathered and consider following the links at the bottom to learn more or make a donation to a cause supporting the Bilby and other native animals.
I’d also be very appreciative if you shared this image to promote such great causes.
Thanks!

"In earlier times, bilbies were found across large areas of Australia, but numbers have declined rapidly in the last one hundred years because of competition for food with farm livestock, and feral rabbits introduced into Australia since European settlement. Other feral animals introduced into Australia, and not native to the Continent, such as feral cats and foxes, have also severely depleted bilby numbers by preying upon them for food, to the point that they have been officially classified nationally, internationally and in the Northern Territory, as Vulnerable to Extinction, while in Queensland under their state legislation the bilby is classified as endangered. 
In order to try and save the bilby from extinction, there have been a number of efforts to create predator-free reserves in Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia and even New South Wales, with varying degrees of success. Importantly, very interesting work is being carried out by local Aboriginal communities in the Outback, close to the areas where the bilby still exists in its traditional habitat and natural environment. For these communities, the bilby is not only a lovely animal, but a very important part of their culture and spiritual beliefs (The Dreaming), literally going back tens of thousands of years. Therefore, for Aboriginal Australians, who did not introduce the feral animals now threatening the bilby’s survival, the loss of the bilby would be very deeply felt. Local Aboriginal communities are working alongside Land Council members and scientists to survey and monitor bilby populations, using traditional tracking skills and expert knowledge of the country. Special methods are being developed to reduce the numbers of predators preying on the bilby. These projects are overseen by the Threatened Species Recovery Team, assisted by the Threatened Species Network, and supported by the Natural Heritage Trust, an Australian Government department. In this way, different people and organisations who share a common concern about the threat to the survival of the bilby, and other native wildlife, can all join together to work for the common good.”
(http://www.australianwildlife.net.au/pdf/bilby/AWS_Project_Bilby.pdf)

There are some great organisations out there doing all they can to help this all ready vulnerable species:
www.savethebilbyfund.com contains loads of information on the work they are doing and you can also purchase some rad products from their online store with the proceeds going to the cause. You can also make direct donations here of varying amounts. 
www.australianwildlife.net.au is another great organisation working to preserve and protect Australia’s wildlife in all its forms. The site also contains a donation section if you want to help the cause.

Australia has a number of native animals that are in a vulnerable position and The Greater Bilby is one of them. If you are at all interested in the preservation of Australia’s unique wildlife, have a read of the small bit of information I have gathered and consider following the links at the bottom to learn more or make a donation to a cause supporting the Bilby and other native animals.

I’d also be very appreciative if you shared this image to promote such great causes.

Thanks!

"In earlier times, bilbies were found across large areas of Australia, but numbers have declined rapidly in the last one hundred years because of competition for food with farm livestock, and feral rabbits introduced into Australia since European settlement. Other feral animals introduced into Australia, and not native to the Continent, such as feral cats and foxes, have also severely depleted bilby numbers by preying upon them for food, to the point that they have been officially classified nationally, internationally and in the Northern Territory, as Vulnerable to Extinction, while in Queensland under their state legislation the bilby is classified as endangered. 

In order to try and save the bilby from extinction, there have been a number of efforts to create predator-free reserves in Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia and even New South Wales, with varying degrees of success. Importantly, very interesting work is being carried out by local Aboriginal communities in the Outback, close to the areas where the bilby still exists in its traditional habitat and natural environment. For these communities, the bilby is not only a lovely animal, but a very important part of their culture and spiritual beliefs (The Dreaming), literally going back tens of thousands of years. Therefore, for Aboriginal Australians, who did not introduce the feral animals now threatening the bilby’s survival, the loss of the bilby would be very deeply felt. Local Aboriginal communities are working alongside Land Council members and scientists to survey and monitor bilby populations, using traditional tracking skills and expert knowledge of the country. Special methods are being developed to reduce the numbers of predators preying on the bilby. These projects are overseen by the Threatened Species Recovery Team, assisted by the Threatened Species Network, and supported by the Natural Heritage Trust, an Australian Government department. In this way, different people and organisations who share a common concern about the threat to the survival of the bilby, and other native wildlife, can all join together to work for the common good.”

(http://www.australianwildlife.net.au/pdf/bilby/AWS_Project_Bilby.pdf)

There are some great organisations out there doing all they can to help this all ready vulnerable species:

www.savethebilbyfund.com contains loads of information on the work they are doing and you can also purchase some rad products from their online store with the proceeds going to the cause. You can also make direct donations here of varying amounts. 

www.australianwildlife.net.au is another great organisation working to preserve and protect Australia’s wildlife in all its forms. The site also contains a donation section if you want to help the cause.

"The shortest distance between two points is often the most unbearable"
Come Sundown release soon.
Instagram = @comesundown

"The shortest distance between two points is often the most unbearable"

Come Sundown release soon.

Instagram = @comesundown

A shirt of mine for the upcoming BME Melbourne range, as shot by Kevin Mayer.

A shirt of mine for the upcoming BME Melbourne range, as shot by Kevin Mayer.

"Because in the end you won’t remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing the lawn"

Instagram = @comesundown

"Because in the end you won’t remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing the lawn"

Instagram = @comesundown

One of those damn days

One of those damn days

Wedge-tailed eagles are the second largest raptors in the world, and a group of them can take down an adult red kangaroo or a 45 year old dude that’s on a 4 day schnapps binge and tripping on shrooms in a caravan park at Inverell, NSW.
Instagram = @marcusdixon

Wedge-tailed eagles are the second largest raptors in the world, and a group of them can take down an adult red kangaroo or a 45 year old dude that’s on a 4 day schnapps binge and tripping on shrooms in a caravan park at Inverell, NSW.

Instagram = @marcusdixon

An older graphic of mine revamped for Grand Scheme winter ‘14 range. 

An older graphic of mine revamped for Grand Scheme winter ‘14 range. 

Shirts for Axis wheels coming soon

Shirts for Axis wheels coming soon